Supply and promotion of alcohol in two Aboriginal communities in rural Western Australia

  • Research program: Needs of Aboriginal Australians
  • Project status: Completed
  • Start date: June 1996
  • Expected end date: January 1998
  • Completion date: November 2010
  • Funded by: Dept. Health and Family Services VIA EDITH COWAN
  • Lead organisation:

This project examined local level supply and promotion of alcohol to Aboriginal people in two communities in rural Western Australia. Using both qualitative and quantitative data, alcohol consumption and related harm was documented, promotional activities in licensed premises were described, and the influence of these activities on Aboriginal drinking patterns was explored. Factors influencing supply and promotion of alcohol included the number and type of outlets, beverage price, location of premises, trading hours, dress standards, security, and the role of taxi drivers. Recommendations to reduce excessive consumption included: limitation of outlet numbers; banning the sale of cheap, damaged wine casks and an overhaul of liquor taxation; a review of covert strategies discouraging Aboriginal patrons from drinking on licensed premises; and a review of the role of taxi drivers in the supply of alcohol.

Name & Contact Details Role Research Program Location
  • Project staff: Deirdre Bourbon, Curtin University

Saggers, S., Gray, D., Bourbon, D. and Parker, R. (1998). Local level supply and promotion of alcohol in two Aboriginal communities in rural Western Australia. National Centre for Research into the Prevention of Drug Abuse, Division of Health Sciences, Curtin University of Technology, Perth, Western Australia. [T78]

Saggers, S. and Gray, D. (1997). Supplying and promoting 'grog': the political economy of alcohol in Aboriginal Australia. Australian Journal of Social Issues, 32, (3), pp. 215-237. [RJ227] View web page