A longitudinal study of influences on alcohol consumption and related harm in Central Australia, with a particular emphasis on the role of price

  • Research program: Needs of Aboriginal Australians
  • Project status: Completed
  • Start date: May 2010
  • Expected end date: June 2013
  • Completion date: November 2013
  • Funded by: FAHCSIA
  • Lead organisation:

This project examined the long-term impact of alcohol control measures on indicators of alcohol-related harm in Central Australia. It was found that there was a significant reduction in alcohol consumption over the period 2000–2010. The control measures that had the greatest impact on consumption were those that were related to price: either indirectly, such as banning of low-cost beverages such as cask table and fortified wine, or directly such as the so-called ‘alcopops tax’. However, the study also showed that price was not the only variable impacting on consumption and related harm, and that a comprehensive supply, demand and harm reduction strategy was needed to further reduce harmful levels of alcohol use in Central Australia.

Name & Contact Details Role Research Program Location
  • Co-investigator: Steven Skov,

Symons, M., Gray, D., Chikritzhs, T., N., Skov, S., J., Saggers, S., Boffa, J. and Low, J. (2012). A longitudinal study of influences on alcohol consumption and related harm in Central Australia: with a particular emphasis on the role of price. National Drug Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth. ISBN: 978-0-9873641-0-4 [T220] Download PDF